The Philosophy of Global Warming


If you are interested in the relationship between the human species and the rest of life on Earth, individual and collective human purpose, evolution, cosmology, the nature of reality, astrology, spirituality, and how all of this relates to global warming & the environmental crisis of modernity, then I am sure that you will like my new book 'The Philosophy of Global Warming'. In the post below I have provided the book description, the list of contents and the first two sections of the book. You can find out how to get hold of the book by clicking on this link:

The Philosophy of Global Warming





Saturday, 30 January 2016

The Goldilocks Zone


A few days ago I came across an article concerning the Goldilocks Zone in the latest edition of the New Scientist magazine. It is a terrible article. The author clearly has no idea what the Goldilocks Zone is, yet he has written an article about it which was published in the magazine.

The Goldilocks Zone is that part of a solar system in which life can survive and thrive. Life can pop up all over the place in terms of microbes, but if this occurs outside of the Goldilocks Zone then this life is doomed to a simple and relatively short existence; it won't be able to evolve into complex life-forms, it won't be able to flourish. For life to flourish it needs to be in the Goldilocks Zone, the segment of a solar system which is neither too close to the Sun (too hot for life to flourish), nor too far from the Sun (too cold for life to flourish). In our Solar System the Earth is in the heart of the Goldilocks Zone. The Earth is the womb of solar-systic life. The Earth is thus the only part of the Solar System which can bring forth complex life-forms like humans, dolphins and dinosaurs. Of course, life has popped up elsewhere in the Solar System, after all, life pops up wherever it possibly can. Indeed, the entire universe is continuously striving to bring forth life wherever it possible can. However, the existence of life in terms of microbes and the flourishing of life within the Goldilocks Zone are two very different things.

In the New Scientist article the author writes:

"What if the Goldilocks story is just a fairy tale?...It's entirely possible that the Goldilocks formula for habitability no longer holds water. Instead, perhaps we should be thinking of habitable worlds as more like raisins in a fruit cake - they can crop up randomly, almost anywhere."

('Where can life exist' by Joshua Howgego, New Scientist, 23 Jan 2016, p. 29)


The mistake that the author makes is to believe that if a simple microbe can exist outside of the Goldilocks Zone (he refers to such an existence, very grandly, as a 'habitable world'), that this undermines the very idea of the Goldilocks Zone. This is a fatal error. Microbes can exist all over the place in a solar system (like "raisins in a fruit cake") but this fact does nothing to undermine the reality of the Goldilocks Zone. The Goldilocks Zone is the only part of a solar system in which these microbes can evolve, thrive, develop and flourish into an amazing plethora of complex life-forms which come to dominate their home / host planet.



Share/Bookmark

No comments:

Post a Comment